Pro-Life Catholic Philosopher Josef Seifert Speaks Out On Coronavirus Vaccine

Editor’s Note: Dr. Joseph Seifert is one of the preeminent Catholic philosophers in the world, and a member of the original Pontifical Academy for Life (PAL), where he was appointed to a lifetime position by his friend, the late Pope John Paul II. After becoming one of the leading voices showing the destructive moral implications in Amoris Laetitia in 2016, Seifert found himself unceremoniously and unjustly removed from his position as the Dietrich von Hildebrand Chair at the International Academy of Philosophy in Granada. In late 2016, Pope Francis went on to gut, and later reconstitute the PAL. Seifert, despite his lifetime appointment, was not invited back. But new members included Nigel Biggar, an abortion supporter; Anne-Marie Pelletier, a defender of sacraments for “remarried” divorcees; Archbishop Vincenzo Paglia (as president of the new academy) – a man who was at the center of a homosexual art scandal, and more. In light of these changes, Seifert went on, in protest, to found the John Paul II Academy for Human Life and the Family (JAHLF), in the hopes of continuing the work of the PAL according to the vision of the late pontiff whose name it bears.

It is our belief that Prof. Seifert’s established credentials and track record of fighting for Catholic moral truth, regardless of opponent or consequences, lend significant weight to his analysis on the pressing and highly controversial matter of the ethics of COVID-19 vaccinations.

It should be noted that it is not Prof. Seifert’s purpose here, nor ours, to evaluate the efficacy, safety, or advisability of these vaccines for reasons related to the nature of their mechanism of action and accelerated release. Those remain open questions with cause for both caution and concern.

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To the Guilty Catholic Mom: A Dose of Reality

Out I stepped into the glorious sunshine one Sunday morning after Mass, the church steps a bustling ground of laughter and pleasantries. However, looking around, I noticed a group of mothers gathered together. There were many tears and hugs being shared. What was happening, I wondered? Was there a miscarriage? A child in physical or spiritual harm? A weighty financial burden? The feeling of failing at homeschooling? The feeling of failing at life? I do not know. But I can say that there was a realness to what I saw. It was raw, severe, sorrowful, and, I think, holy.

Rather moved by what I saw, I attempted later to connect with my long-neglected inner-feelings and write what my wife calls a mom blog. Unsurprisingly, I failed miserably at appearing compassionate. The best I could muster was to vituperatively tell a few Catholic moms that they needed to stop beating themselves up if supper was late, the potatoes burnt, the house a tornado disaster area, the children worn out from crying all day, or if they themselves were worn out from crying all day. Mrs. Facebook-Perfect does not exist. The only Mrs. Perfect is Our Lady, and she would be far too sensible to spend a moment on Zuckerberg’s leftist paradise anyway. Yes, life is hard, but a mother nurturing needless guilt helps no one.

The response I received from several moms after this little write-up surprised me. I expected to be told to mind my own business, or even that husbands should try complimenting their wives occasionally. However, this was not the case at all. Apparently, many tears were shed from hearing the simple words, “stop beating yourself up.” It took me off guard, and it enlightened me to the feelings of guilt many Catholic mothers struggle with when their lives are, inevitably, not in perfect order.

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The Eucharistic Miracle of Avignon

“Of all the sacred mysteries bequeathed to us by Our Lord and Saviour—there is none more comparable to the most holy Sacrament of the Eucharist; so, for no crime is there a heavier punishment to be feared from God than for unholy or irreligious use by the faithful of that which is full of holiness—which contains the very author and source of holiness.” (The Roman Catechism) 

This belief in the Eucharist is a timeless understanding held by Catholics around the world. And yet we have Bishop Batzing, President of Germany’s Bishop’s Conference, saying in a recent online conference that “anyone who is Protestant and attends Communion can receive Communion.” He was referring to an ecumenical event to take place in the country on May 15.

To which we want to shout out: “Bishop Batzing, read your Catechism!”

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