Christ the King and Halloween

Rebuilding Christendom is all about the children.

Besides Christmas, Halloween is probably the most well-loved holiday for your average kid, Catholic or not (at least in the nation I live in). The reason is obvious to any child of ten years or less: candy. Every year thousands of kids have fun dressing up and getting candy.

But for a pious Catholic parent, the prominence of skeletons, ghosts and occult imagery is enough to remove your children from the celebration all together. However, there is in fact a traditional celebration of this time among our fathers that we need to reclaim if we want to be rebuild Christendom.

Praise the Lord

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A Warning to the Carmelites of Fairfield

Last month a couple of the nuns of the Fairfield Carmel were seen attending Mass at the FSSP apostolate, our parish in the ancient centre, Santissima Trinita dei Pellegrini. These are the sisters who have become famous throughout the Traditional Catholic world for their attempt to live the Teresian Discalced Carmelite life in the most authentic and faithful way possible.

Puzzling as it may have been for strictly cloistered nuns to be out and about, it was cleared up a few days later with an article announcing that the Fairfield Carmelites are about to undergo the “trial” of an Apostolic Visitation. On September 23rd, the community authorised a press release to alert the Catholic world, which LifeSite published. Anyone who has paid attention to anything in the last 8 years will know what this means:

This coming weekend, we ask that you pray in a special way for our Nuns. More than ever before, they are in need of your love and your support.

Praise the Lord

Read the Whole Article at https://onepeterfive.com/

How Much Can the Pope Change Our Rites, and Why Would He?

In discussions of whether or not the pope has the authority to radically change the Church’s liturgy, the claim has been made that “if he can modify the bread from leavened to unleavened and limit reception to one species—which pertain even to the substance of the sacrament!—then of course he can do anything else.” I want to explain why this claim is a gigantic non sequitur.

Before proceeding, I will note that there is no good historical evidence that all ancient liturgies were using leavened bread until at some point a pope flexed his pontifical muscle to say: “No more! From here on out, we will use only unleavened bread.” The comprehensive article on “Azymes” by Church historian Dom Fernand Cabrol in the authoritative Dictionnaire d’Archéologie Chrétienne et de Liturgie (vol. 1, cols. 3254–60) says nothing about such a purported papal change. We need to be careful not to fall into the trap of the common assumption (which in the field of liturgy is totally unjustified) that everything in the East is much more ancient than everything in the West, and that the East never changes; ergo, if the East uses leavened bread, and the West uses unleavened bread, that must be because the older and “original” custom is to use leavened bread, and the West must have changed it. In any case, evidence does not support the idea that any shift that may have occurred was due to simple papal fiat.[1] Early Church history is generally a lot more complicated, confusing, and polymorphic—and, it’s always humbling to remember, a lot less documented—than we, with our tidy scholastic boxes, might wish it were.

Be that as it may, let’s assume, for the sake of argument, that a pope could make such a change of matter in the sacrament, and that he did make it. Similarly, he could choose to permit or not permit Communion under both kinds; he may add or not add the Filioque; and any number of other discrete changes of that sort. The interesting question is: How much does it matter, and what does it prove?

Praise the Lord

Read the Whole Article at https://onepeterfive.com/