More love from @AustenI

Ladies and gentlemen, Austen Ivereigh!

If there is a conflict between the rubrics for the extraordinary form and the bishops’ directives during the pandemic, the obvious solution is to suspend the extraordinary form until it is safe to resume. https://t.co/LU7F11SxFg

— Austen Ivereigh (@austeni) August 6, 2020

Praise the Lord

Read the Whole Article at https://wdtprs.com/

Five Reasons Why the Transfiguration Really Happened

You know the old schtick from the New Testament scholars: all those miracles stories and supernatural events?

They’re all pious fiction. Somebody made it up. It’s “mythical”. They added that stuff to make Jesus more special. They added that stuff to make it seem like he was fulfilling Old Testament prophecy. They cooked up those stories to make him into the Son of God.

Pshaw! It never happened! How gullible are you? C’mon. Get real. He was just an ordinary country preacher who had a run of bad luck.

Praise the Lord

Read the Whole Article at https://dwightlongenecker.com/

The Catholic Origins of Modern International Relations Theory

When teaching the history of the field of International Relations (IR), scholars tend to start with the classical author of The Peloponnesian War, Thucydides, then skip immediately to the early modern political theorists Machiavelli and Hobbes.  In the process, they ignore the entire medieval period and, therefore, the rich history of Catholic international thought that flourished in that period.  There are, of course, exceptions to this rule.  Reinhold Neibuhr, for example, famously drew on the works of Saint Augustine as he helped launch the school of international relations theory known as Realism in the mid-20th century.  But this is the exception.  For the most part, the great Catholic international thinkers of the Middle Ages are simply erased from history.  This is my humble effort to undo that grave error.

Augustine:  Human Nature and International Relations

Augustine of Hippo, admittedly a figure of late antiquity but crucially important to understanding medieval political thought, is typically introduced to students as the founder of Just War theory.  While this is certainly an apt description of the Doctor of Grace, it does not fully capture his contribution to the Realist tradition of international thought.  As Reinhold Niebuhr and other 20th century Realists have pointed out, Augustine’s primary contribution is his insight that politics are driven by the lust for power (libido dominandi) and that this results in international relations that inherently conflictual.  As Augustine put it: “The dispute between Cain and Abel proved that there is enmity between the two cities themselves, the City of God and the city of man. Accordingly, there are battles of wicked against wicked. There are also battles of wicked against good and good against wicked. In the 20th century, this became known as the “first image” explanation for war – the view that wars result from human nature and are, therefore, an enduring element of political life.  And this leads to his second insight, that the prospects for political progress, and especially for political perfection, are vanishingly small.  Humanity is fallen, and “insofar as men are sinful, the threat of war hangs over them, and hang over them it will until the return of Christ.”

Praise the Lord

Read the Whole Article at https://onepeterfive.com/