Care Not Killing: The Royal College of General Practitioners continues to oppose Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia

The Royal College of General Practitioners (UK) announced that they will not change their position on assisted dying after receiving the results of a member survey indicating that 47% of the members opposed assisted suicide, 40% support assisted suicide 11% support neutrality and 2% did not take a position. The following is the text from a media release from the Care Not Killing Alliance UK.

Dr Gordon MacdonaldDr Gordon Macdonald, Chief Executive of Care Not Killing commented:’The current laws on assisted suicide and euthanasia exist to protect those who are sick, elderly, depressed or disabled from feeling obliged to end their lives. It protects those who have no voice against exploitation and coercion. ‘We are pleased that the Royal College of General Practitioners recognise this and the dog whistle message that singling out the terminally ill and disabled people would send. As Paralympian Tanni Grey-Thompson has said, “Legalising assisted suicide will only serve to reinforce deep seated prejudices that the lives of sick and disabled people aren’t worth as much as other people’s.”Dr Macdonald continued:’Just look at what is happening in Canada, which introduced assisted suicide and euthanasia in 2016. Since then around 13,000 people have been killed. Then in September, the Quebec Superior Court struck down the requirement that a person be terminally ill before they qualify for euthanasia in Canada, allowing those with chronic conditions and mental health problems to have their lives ended. ‘But even before this court ruling there had been problems. In July a depressed, but otherwise healthy 61-year-old man, was euthanised in the province of British Columbia. Alan Nichols, a former school caretaker who lived alone was admitted to Chilliwack General Hospital, BC. Despite not being terminally ill, he received a lethal injection. Alan’s case is not isolated. ‘The problems in Canada are not unique. This summer, a major US report from the National Council on Disability, found the laws in the handful of States that had gone down this route, were ineffective and oversight of abuse and mistakes was absent. ‘This is an important report as those championing assisted suicide in this country, put forward a model based on Oregon and Washington – Yet in both States a majority of those ending their lives cite fear of becoming a burden a reason. ‘The current laws that prevent assisted suicide and euthanasia do not need changing.’For media inquiries, please call Alistair Thompson on 07970 162225.

Ends

Praise the Lord

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April Catholic Kids Bulletin: Palm Sunday, Holy Week, Easter, & Divine Mercy

These FREE Catholic Mass Bulletin Printables are offered each month to help young Catholics learn at Mass. You are welcome to print and share with others. If you can afford it, click Support CKB on the right and donate to help pay for the time and effort put into these pages. Thanks!

The Catholic Kids Bulletin worksheets match up to the weekly Mass readings in the Catholic Church. There are coloring pages that match the weekly Gospel reading. There are activities throughout the month, along with Psalm copy work and a word search. The liturgy of the Mass is outlined along the top of each bulletin so kids can follow along during Mass and learn the order and structure of the Mass. Each week, a Catholic Saint is also highlighted. These are terrific to be used at Mass, or as a pre-teaching activity to help prepare your students for the Sunday Mass.

Quite a few of you ordered this book that I mentioned recently–did you like it?

Praise the Lord

Read the Whole Article at http://www.catholickidsbulletin.com/

Lenten Second Sunday and the Salvific Spirit of Sacrifice

‘This is my Son, the Beloved; with him I am well pleased; listen to him!’ When the disciples heard this, they fell to the ground and were overcome by fear (Mt.17:6). ⧾

On the second Sunday in Lent we always read the Gospel of the Transfiguration of Our Lord. We do so in order that our focus may be directed towards the glory of Easter and Our Lord’s victory over sin and death through His Passion and glorious Resurrection. The Preface of the Mass instructs us about the meaning of this mystery: After he had told his disciples of his coming Death, on the holy mountain he manifested to them his glory, to show even by the testimony of the law and the prophets, that the Passion leads to the glory of the Resurrection (Preface of the Second Sunday in Lent, The Roman Missal). More importantly however, at the intimate, interior level of our personal relationship with God, we recognise that the Cross in our life and specifically the Sacrament of the Cross which is the Eucharist are the means by which our life is conformed to and transformed by the grace of God. We describe this as the Paschal Mystery  and through it we are given to share in the life of God. The effect of this Mystery in us is our personal transformation in Christ. We worship God and in so doing we are transformed into His likeness.

The Transfiguration describes what is rightly termed a theophany, a manifestation of God. In the Transfiguration Jesus is revealed as God’s Son, the Beloved. It is an act of self-disclosure in which a personal God reveals what we could not know about Him by ourselves. God reveals Himself not as an impersonal cosmological principle, an indeterminate force. He reveals the Trinitarian Mystery. This truth is permanent and definitive and it is the foundation of our Christian life. In his monumental work, The City of God, St. Augustine explains the importance of worship as exemplified by the posture of Peter, James and John who fell to the ground in the presence of God. It is nothing but folly, nothing but pitiable aberration to humble yourself before a being you would hate to resemble in the conduct of  your life and to worship one whom you would refuse to imitate. For surely the supremely important thing in religion is to model oneself on the object of one’s worship (The City of God, VIII, 17). These words were an answer to the pagans of his day who objected that the God Augustine believed in, the very same God we believe in, was too demanding. The common objections we hear in our day is that you don’t have to be religious to be a good person; and the god that many profess to believe in just wants us to be nice and of course, to recycle. Such a god is not one before whom we fall down in worship and adoration, and such a god in time, becomes irrelevant. In truth, there is no worship involved in this, and by consequence nothing and no one to emulate and model oneself on. In this vacuum there is either idolatry of the self or despair. These errors to a certain extent have crept into the Church, and if unchecked, they have the power to lead us also down this path of meaninglessness and despair.

Praise the Lord

Read the Whole Article at https://catholicinsight.com/