Come and See

This past week saw our third annual Familiares retreat.  The Familiares are young men who, being too young to formally enter the monastery, and wishing to further explore the religious vocation, join themselves to the Sons of the Most Redeemer as Familiars, in the spirit of the Minor Seminaries and Juvinates of old.

Those who wish to become Familiars join themselves to our religious family in a formal manner.  They are clothed in the habit of the Congregation, and are permitted to wear it on certain occasions, to enter into the enclosure of the monastery and join us for an experience of religious life.

One such occasion is the annual Familiares retreat.

Praise the Lord

Read the Whole Article at http://papastronsay.blogspot.com/

I Did Not Know Him. A Meditation on a Saying By St. John the Baptist

In Sunday’s Gospel (John 1:29ff) John the Baptist speaks of Jesus, calling him superior, pre-existent, and anointed by the Holy Spirit. But what also stands out is that twice he says, “I did not know him.” This seems odd given that they were cousins. While it is possible that the text merely means they were not well acquainted, it is likely the text means something more, something deeper. It is as if he is saying, “I knew him, but I never really knew him. I never really saw until now the full depths of him, I did not fully realize his glory; not until God showed me. ”  

That John missed seeing these deeper realities is understandable since the Lord hid these qualities to some extent. The Letter to the Philippians says, 

[Jesus], being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God something to cling to; rather, he emptied himself by taking the very nature of a servant, being made in human likeness. And being found in appearance as a man, he thus humbled himself becoming obedient to death— even death on a cross! Therefore God exalted him and gave him the name that is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue proclaim that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father. (Phil 2:6-11)

Praise the Lord

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Purgatory: Reality or Myth (Spanish) Purgatorio mitico.

La mayorÍade las personas tememos la muerte. Es una realidad y un suceso cierto e ineludible que muchas veces queremos eludir. Nuestra naturaleza tiende a la eternidad y a la inmortalidad. No enetendemos el por qué todo se debe acabar con  el fin de nuestros cuerpos mortales y buscamos recetas y panaceas tecnológicas para alargar nuestra vida o tartar de evitar la muerte.

Inquietud universal que nos deja ver que la enseñánza de la fe católica acerca de la vida eternal y la felicidad plena o cielo está cargada de verdad y que además responde a los anhelos más profundos del ser humano.

Praise the Lord

Read the Whole Article at https://associationofcatholicwomenbloggers.blogspot.com/

OLDIE PODCAzT 127: The Eve of St. Agnes and a Bleak Midwinter

As a favor to a friend, I’ll repost this old podcast.  It is the Eve of the Feast of St. Agnes, which of course reminds us of the famous poem by Keats.

I, fan of poetry that I am, read out Keat’s poem, 42 Spencerian stanzas.  It is torrid and lush, with marvelous moments and imagery, imbued with the revival of romantic, courtly love which was coming back into vogue in the early 19th century.

The poem takes inspiration from a superstition, which I explain in an introduction.

Praise the Lord

Read the Whole Article at https://wdtprs.com/