The weekend…

…described below, with a wonderful Newman conference, began for me with a busy Friday. I  spent the afternoon helping to fold and pack letters for the Friends of the Ordinariate, inviting people to the celebration of the 10th anniversary of the Ordinariate at the Church of the Most Precious Blood on November 9th. We were a cheery group of volunteers, enlivened by fresh brews of tea and lively conversation.

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Our Lady of Guadalupe Circle Releases Message of Support on Indigenous Languages

Today, Our Lady of Guadalupe Circle released a statement entitled “Message of support from Our Lady of Guadalupe Circle on the occasion of the United Nations 2019 Year of Indigenous Languages”. A Canadian Catholic coalition of Indigenous people, Bishops, clergy, members of lay movements and of men and women belonging to institutes of consecrated life, Our Lady of Guadalupe Circle seeks to renew and foster relations between the Catholic Church and Indigenous Peoples in Canada. This open Letter to all Canadians affirms the major significance of language in the revitalization of Indigenous cultures and expresses a commitment to finding ways to support this essential aspect of reconciliation. Following the conclusion of the Circle’s meeting in Edmonton, Alberta, the statement and a promotional video were previewed by the community at Sacred Heart parish of the First Peoples. To view the video and download the message of support, visit Our Lady of Guadalupe Circle’s website at https://ourladyofguadalupecircle.ca/. For more information, contact Tracy Blain at blain@cccb.ca.

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Le Cercle Notre-Dame-de-Guadalupe publie un message de soutien pour les langues autochtones

Aujourd’hui, le Cercle Notre-Dame-de-Guadalupe a publié une déclaration intitulée « Message de soutien du Cercle Notre-Dame-de-Guadalupe à l’occasion de l’année des langues autochtones proclamée par les Nations Unies en 2019 ». Une coalition catholique canadienne de personnes autochtones, d’évêques, de membres du clergé, des mouvements laïcs et d’instituts de vie consacrée pour femmes et pour hommes, le Cercle Notre-Dame-de-Guadalupe cherche à renouveler et à promouvoir les relations entre l’Église catholique et les peuples autochtones au Canada. Cette lettre ouverte à tous les Canadiens et Canadiennes affirme l’importance marquante de la langue dans la revitalisation des cultures autochtones et exprime un engagement à trouver des moyens d’appuyer cet aspect essentiel de la réconciliation. Après la réunion du Cercle tenue à Edmonton (Alberta), la déclaration et une vidéo promotionnelle ont été présentées à la communauté de la paroisse Sacred Heart des Premières nations. Pour visionner la vidéo (en anglais seulement) et télécharger le message de soutien, veuillez visiter le site web du Cercle Notre-Dame-de-Guadalupe, au https://ourladyofguadalupecircle.ca/. Pour de plus amples renseignements, veuillez communiquer avec Tracy Blain au blain@cccb.ca.

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Archbishop Smith: Budget Day

This past week the province of Alberta tabled its much-anticipated budget. Everyone was wondering what would be the areas of maintained or increased investment of government dollars and where there would be cutbacks in spending. The budget will now have a significant impact on the lives of the citizens of this province. Some people will interpret that impact positively, while others will view it in negative terms.

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To a fascinating Newman conference…

…at Thornycroft Hall, with speakers  examining aspects of  St JHN’s  message on education.  Paul Shrimpton spoke extremely  well on  the Idea of a University which he noted was published in 1873 and written some twenty years earlier, but remains “a defining text to this day”. He emphasised that Newman saw university education not as the acquisition of knowledge but the cultivation of the mind”, and that a university is a secular institution “yet partaking of a religious character”.  Roy Peachey, a teacher at The Cedars School   spoke about Dorothy L. Sayers ‘ Lost Tools of Learning in which she showed how the Medieval trivium – grammar, dialectic, rhetoric – could and should be rediscovered today. He mentioned the “pedagogy of place” which echoes Newman’s  emphasis on the genius loci  which hands on “a tradition, a bond of union, an ethical atmosphere”. And Mrs Lynch Kelly of St Martin’s Academy  Stoke Goulding spoke about how to do it all: the school aims to teach  pupils “the best that has been thought and said” and that they are loved by their teachers and by God…

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